Archive for the ‘Wildlife and Nature’ Category

Wallaby Kempsey area

Wallaby Kempsey area

Possums, sugar gliders, wallabies and quolls are just some of the many native animals  injured in bushfire, car accidents and severe weather events. Many of these animals including native and migratory birds end up in the care of FAWNA Mid North Coast.

On Sunday the 17th October 2017 FAWNA volunteers gathered in the Theatrette Room at Sea Acres Rainforest Centre for the annual Bryce Laut Awards.

Bryce Laut was a NPWS Fire Management Officer tragically killed in 2008 when a tree fell on him during a cleanup operation following a bushfire. The fire was believed to have been deliberately lit. He worked closely with FAWNA and was responsible for training volunteers in wildlife rescue in the fire ground shortly after bushfire events. A donation was made to FAWNA in memory of Bryce Laut leading to the creation of the annual awards for wildlife volunteers .

Area manager Manning Hastings National Parks and Wildlife Service Steve Atkins with FAWNA President Meredith Ryan.

Area manager Manning Hastings National Parks and Wildlife Service Steve Atkins with FAWNA President Meredith Ryan.

FAWNA receives an average of seven calls a day related to injured wildlife. Some of these animals need veterinary and rehabilitation care.

Area manager for the Manning Hastings National Parks and Wildlife Service Steve Atkins presented the awards with FAWNA president Meredith Ryan. Mr Atkins thanked all volunteers on behalf of NPWS and described their commitment for rescue, rehabilitation and release as fantastic. He said ” without your assistance there is a lot of wildlife that would not be out there now”.

FAWNA President Meredith Ryan presenting local vet Sarah Bennett with a lifetime membership award

FAWNA President Meredith Ryan presenting local vet Sarah Bennett with a lifetime membership award

This year’s awards saw Sarah Bennett of Oxley Highway Veterinary Hospital receive an Honorary Life Membership. The award was presented to Sarah as recognition of skilled veterinary services and dedication to injured, orphaned and displaced wildlife in the Port Macquarie Hastings region. A willingness to advise and guide FAWNA volunteers in the rescue and rehabilitation of wildlife was also acknowledged. FAWNA volunteer Wendy Pfeil expressed her gratitude for Sarah’s help during wildlife emergencies.

Meredith Ryan, Sarah Bennett, June Le Pla and Wendy Pfeil

Meredith Ryan, Sarah Bennett, June Le Pla and Wendy Pfeil

Dianne Waterhouse and Neville Elford were recognised for their 20 years of work with FAWNA at Kempsey including the rehabilitation and release of Red-neck wallabies on their property.

The runner up of the Bryce Laut award was Pat Davey a member since 2001 with six years duty on the 24/7 phone and rescue line. Pat has been been a carer and release member of macropods while training and mentoring FAWNA’s phone staff. Her recognition was for dedication to FAWNA and ensuring telephones were maintained.

Meredith Ryan, June Le Pla, Pat Davey and Steve Atkins.

Meredith Ryan, June Le Pla, Pat Davey and Steve Atkins.

First place award went to June Le Pla for rescue and rehabilitation work along with fund raising efforts.

Ist Place award winner June Le Pla

Ist Place award winner June Le Pla

Steve Atkins said June has rescued and rehabilitated more animals than most in her two decades of service to FAWNA. Undertaking regular patrols of Hastings coastal areas June has taken responsibility for rescuing seabirds. June is not selective in the animals she cares for and has added flying foxes and bats to her skill sets which also include possums, gliders and seabirds.

Also in attendance was FAWNA’s patron Dr Mary E White (AM).

Follow the link below to read and see more about Dr White.

https://brettdolsenphotography.wordpress.com/2013/11/03/dr-mary-e-white/

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Nanapush is getting old now. He had moved north to where the ice was plentiful and had been living in retirement. He had been a trickster often seen as a rabbit but above all was known for his teachings of humanity. It was said by some he was the son of the west wind or the sun.

Nanapush - The Trickster

Nanapush – The Trickster

In recent times Nanapush had became concerned by the melting ice and the uncertainty of the animals. He sensed that it was time for him to return to his teachings. He was once again needed.
He called all the creatures of the world, both new and old, to meet in the ancient forests and special places across the earth.
He summonsed the Wematekan’is (magical little people) to help him on his journey. Their role was to help teach the the seventh generation, by their mischievous little actions, about the changes now occurring.

A note of warning – Don’t upset the Wematekan’is!

The Wematekan’is are mischievous little creatures but can serve as messengers of the Great Spirit.

Wematekan'is magical little people of the forest.

Wematekan’is magical little people of the forest.

Nanapush and the Wematekan’is travelled far around the world searching for those who were still in tune with the natural world. They travelled the ancient worlds of Gondwana and Laurasia, once the two great continents, where many of the great animals evolved and moved freely.

Gondwana and animals of ancient lands

Gondwana and animals of ancient lands

An old man from the south was visiting the forest, and was able to see all the animals in the naughty little tricks played by the Wematekan’is.

For three days the old man returned to the forest knowing that his visions were special but still unable to understand.

Suddenly Nanapush appeared and told him to listen.

We are the creatures from both old and new.

You have been chosen to see us. Our message is clear.

After this first vision I returned to the forest.

After this first vision I returned to the forest.

Our homes are being destroyed and the thunder beings are angry. Many of the animals, big and small have disappeared. We are sad because the greedy ones are not heeding the warnings and listening to mother nature. They are blinded by gold and power rather than the joy of life.

A wise figure appeared in my quest.

A wise figure appeared in my quest.

We all share the fields, the mountains, the forest and oceans. The great North Mountain and his brothers have spoken to you. Your help is needed.

Listen to the old teacher who has taught you about life on earth. She has great wisdom and she knows the truth.

Everything is written in the trees and in the rocks. Look closely and understand the great oceans and the air we breathe are suffering too.

Share your visions because what is most important will be written in the minds of all people.

Creatures of the Sea

Creatures of the Sea

The Stallion

The Stallion

The story above is my interpretation of the visions I saw in my three short visits to the forest. The story is told with great respect to Native Americans and Eastern Woodland culture. The Anishinabe, Ojibway, Algonquin and Lenape had close ties with my ancestors and their stories are reflected above. See more at http://www.native-languages.org/munsee-legends.htm

Look closely at the images in the following link and find more legends of the forest.https://brettdolsenphotography.wordpress.com/legends-of-the-forest/

My thanks to “One Who Knows” for making me aware of the Wematekan’is.

Lake Cathie is a small coastal village on the mid north coast of NSW Australia.

No Monday Morning Blues

No Monday Morning Blues

Are you looking for a peaceful and relaxing location for your next holiday? Be assured Lake Cathie has it all. White sandy beaches and an extensive lake system with nature reserves, have first time visitors returning each year. Fishing, surfing and its close proximity to services and local attractions, gives visitors a welcome respite from the daily pace of city and inland rural lifestyles.

Surfing at Middle Rock Lake Cathie

Surfing at Middle Rock Lake Cathie local identity Peter Hudson.

I moved to Lake Cathie in 1995 influenced by my son and his love of surfing. Within a short time I was back in the water myself. After a fifteen year break from surfing the quality of the local waves was too hard to pass up.
Surfing is high on the list for many visitors, with a large local surfing community growing over the past thirty years. In recent years the area has been host to Australian surfing title events including short board, long board, stand up paddle and kite surfing.

Sunrise at Lake Cathie NSW Australia

Sunrise at Lake Cathie NSW Australia

Located just twenty kilometres south of Port Macquarie, Lake Cathie has been a popular tourist destination for over fifty years. This area of coastline is considered to have the best all year round liveable climate in Australia.
This large coastal estuary also includes the neighbouring Lake Innes. At the upper reaches are the Innes Ruins classified by the National Trust of Australia (NSW). Built between 1831 and 1843 by Major Archibald Clunes Innes, the house consisted of 22 rooms and is the oldest structure built of bricks in northern NSW. The site is managed by National Parks and Wildlife. Tours are available on select days.
After a channel was excavated by landowners in the 1930’s,Lake Innes became easily accessible for small boats from Lake Cathie. Fishing is a major attraction and Lake Cathie is known for the quality of its school prawns during the summer months.
There are small boat launching ramps at Jabiru Reserve and the Perch Hole.

The Perch Hole

The Perch Hole

Lake Cathie is surrounded by Nature Reserves. To the north of the town is the Lake Innes Nature Reserve accessible via the Perch Hole Track. Throughout this nature reserve can be seen many varieties of heathland plants including christmas bells, boronia, banksia and flannel flower.

Christmas Bells Plains

Christmas Bells Plains

Lake Cathie is also well known for its koala population and the eastern grey kangaroo can be seen from a number of locations in the village. Other wildlife seen around the town include echidna, wallaby, jabiru, black cockatoo and an abundance of water birds including egrets, herons, eagles, hawks, oyster catchers and many more. During winter and spring, migrating humpback whales can be seen from several coastal viewing platforms. For a photographer (like myself) my camera is always on hand for those unpredictable and special moments.

Eastern Grey Kagaroo crossing Lake Cathie

Eastern Grey Kangaroo crossing Lake Cathie. Image taken from canoe.

A short drive south are the coastal towns of Bonny Hills and Laurieton. Visits to Queens Lake Nature Reserve, Dooragang National Park and Diamond Head are recommended. There are breathtaking views from the top of North Brother Mountain looking both north and south along the NSW coastline. A one hour drive inland will take you to the elevated rural town of Comboyne, where 705 metres above sea level clouds often roll across the green pastured landscape.
An old saying when cold winter winds blow down on the coast is :-
“It must be snowing at Comboyne”.

Winter Swell at Lake Cathie

Winter Swell at Lake Cathie

Lake Cathie like other Australian towns has got a big something. The Big Bowl fronts the Lake Cathie bowling club, a popular destination for visiting lawn bowlers and local enthusiasts. Nightly meals are available for families and live entertainment on weekends. There is also a tavern and takeaways for meals, along with a modern supermarket and chemist for all other needs. There are several motels and various other lodgings available, including a caravan park on Ocean Drive.
By now you will have realised I’m a little biased towards my home town and all the great activities it has to offer the holiday maker. There is so much to explore in this area and make sure you get some great tips from the friendly locals.
If you were to ask me what is the best time of year to come, I would say “Anytime”.

Come throw a line at Lake Cathie NSW Australia!

Fishing at the Lakemouth

Fishing at the Lakemouth

To see more of Lake Cathie check out the following slideshow!